Month: March 2020

Till We Have Faces

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Till We Have Faces, written by C.S. Lewis and published in 1956, is a thought-provoking and convicting novel ended with a powerful unexpected thrust. Lewis reworks the timeless myth of Cupid and Psyche into a tale of two sisters, one ugly and embittered and the other beautiful and kind. Follow the elder sister Orual as she battles with pride, toxic love, and anger against the gods who ruined her life and stole her sister.
I would highly recommend this book for ages 16+. There are some mature elements younger readers might not fully understand, as well as some deep themes to pick apart and think upon. A masterful tale of the struggle between true and toxic love, ranked among some of C.S. Lewis’s finest works. 4.5 out of 5 stars.

The Boy Who Steals Houses

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Featuring broken boys, waffles, stolen keys, bruised knuckles, family, lockpicks, loneliness, and caramel-The Boy Who Steals Houses, written by C.G. Drews and published in Great Britain in 2019 by The Watts Publishing Group, is a truly inspiring, deeply moving story of a lonely boy named Sammy Lou, his brother Avery, and a girl named Moxie who’s made of sharp corners and a lemonade smile. This is a story of brokenness and belonging, of bruised knuckles and pure love, of stolen houses and families who steal your heart.

If lost, please return to the De Laineys.*

I would recommend The Boy Who Steals Houses for ages 17+-there is some mature language and a few thematic elements to be wary of, including child abuse and other violence. This book is one of the most well-written books I’ve ever read, and remains among the few that have made me cry while reading. The Boy Who Steals Houses falls under the contemporary\inspirational genre and has excellent family themes, beautiful but unusual descriptions, and memorable characters. 4.5 out of 5 stars.

*Excerpt taken from The Boy Who Steals Houses, written by C.G. Drews and published in Great Britain in 2019 by The Watts Publishing Group.

The Book Thief

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*** The Book Thief-LAST LINE***
I have hated the words and
I have loved them,
and I hope I have made them right.*

Liesel Meminger is a thief. A book thief. She steals the words and devours them, then spills them out to others. But it is a dangerous time for words. The Führer is orchestrating war, and it is sweeping across the world. Nazi Germany is not friendly to words. Or Jews. So when Liesel’s family hides both words and a Jew in their house, they must be careful. Death is busy, but not too busy to make a stop at Himmel Street.

I saw the book thief three times.*

I highly recommend The Book Thief, written by Markus Zusak and published in 2005 by Alfred A. Knopf, for ages 17+. This was a phenomenal read; featuring books, colors, swastikas, fire, love, teddy bears, stolen apples, and Death himself. The Book Thief brought out the horrors of war and hatred, but also the joys of love, kindness, and words. Moving and impactful-but with a few mature themes and some language to watch out for, as well as violence. 4.5 out of 5 stars.

Yes, often, I am reminded of her, and in one of my vast array of pockets, I have kept her story to retell. It is one of the small legion I carry, each one extraordinary in its own right. Each one an attempt-an immense leap of an attempt-to prove to me that you, and your human existence, are worth it.
Here it is. One of a handful.
The Book Thief.
If you feel like it, come with me. I will tell you a story.
I’ll show you something.*

I am haunted by humans.*

 

*All excerpts taken from The Book Thief, written by Markus Zusak and published in 2005 by Alfred A. Knopf.